Connecticut snakes are often maligned but do not tend to be aggressive. If you leave them alone, they are going to leave you alone. Our snakes, including the 2 vipers, only bite if handled or threatened. Snakes are actually helpful, eating many of the small rodents that cause trouble and thus keeping their population at a manageable level. Fourteen species of snakes live in Connecticut, including two that inject venom when they bite. While some species are located within a limited range, the majority are found all over this relatively small state. Because of development and habitat loss, some once-common Connecticut snake species are increasingly hard to locate.

Northern Black Racer

Northern Copperhead

Northern Brown Snake

Eastern Ratsnake

Eastern Garter Snake

Eastern Hognose Snake

Eastern Milksnake

Northern Water snake

Northern Redbelly Snake

Eastern Ribbonsnake

Northern Ringneck Snake

Smooth Green snake

Timber Rattlesnake

Eastern Worm Snake

Connecticut is home to 14 species of snakes and only two are venomous. The Black racer (Coluber c. constrictor), Dekay’s brownsnake (Storeria d. dekayi), Eastern ratsnake (Pantherophis obsoletus), Garternake (Thamnophis s. sirtalis), Hog-nosed snake (Heterodon platirhinos), milk snake (Lampropeltis t. triangulum), northern watersnake (Nerodia sipedon sipedon), redbelly snake (Storeria o. occipitomaculata), ribbonsnake (Thamnophis sauritus), ring-necked snake (Diadophis punctatus edwardsii), smooth greensnake (Liochlorophis vernalis) and worm snake (Carphophis a. amoenus)) are non-venomous. The Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix mokasen) and Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) are venomous. In the state of the Connecticut, the Timber rattlesnake is listed as endangered and Eastern ratsnake is regulated with both the Ribbonsnake and Hog-nosed snake as of special concern.

Snakes are actually helpful, eating many of the small rodents that cause trouble and thus keeping their population at a manageable level for gardeners like myself.

 

Snake of Old Lyme CT
Snakes are actually helpful, eating many of the small rodents
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